OYOP

Tactility isn’t the first association made when thinking about 3D printed objects. Although the printing technology is already infiltrating the fashion and design scene, the outcomes of the process generally pursue a futuristic design language that’s hard to envision as part of daily life. As a response, Rudi Boiten and Mireille Burger – better known as Studio_Plott – set out to add a more human touch to digital fabrication. By reinterpreting techniques used in the textile industry – such as stitching, weaving and knitting – and translating them into patterns that can be read by a self-developed, computer-controlled printing device, the duo brings traditional textile-forming techniques into the present. The printing filaments are utilized like the yarns of a textile, underpinning the designers’ idea to deploy 3D printing in the creation of graphic, yet tactile, surfaces. Current experiments include tests in flexibility, tactility and diversity. The main goal? To develop a material with both functional and aesthetic value which can be used in the creation of multi-dimensional ‘home textiles’.